ADDY’S // Thanksgiving on the sidewalk

March 31, 2013 § Leave a comment

Most foodies of this generation have laid claim to the food cart trend as their own, forgetting that it was booming in the late 1920s and on. However, today’s version has a gourmet twist. The flocks of fully-functioning, health code approved trucks that line the streets of big cities like Portland, New York, New Orleans, and Atlanta are no longer just serving the staples, like hot dogs and hamburgers. In Portland especially, the ethnic (and trendy) variety is astounding. No more chains, no more mall food courts, no more hole-in-the-wall Mexican restaurants: the gourmet food cart phenomenon is here and it’s spreading.

Last year, a story popped up on the Associated Press about the evolution of this trend, discussing the economical benefits of the food truck industry. In the wake of unemployment and real estate prices, the food cart is a viable option for talented foodies who want to be self-employed and independent of landlords and the like. While some of this small entrepreneurs are still battling ordinances and paperwork hoops in cities like Chicago, most large cultural centers have eased up to allow these culinary havens to flourish.

In Portland, the food cart industry is one of the most popular features of this health-conscious hipster-vegan mecca. One particular food cart that shines above the rest is Addy’s Sandwich Bar, a cheesy, fruity, French-esque heaven for your taste buds. If you ever visit Portland with an indecisive group of travelers, stroll over to Alder street, where the massive variety of food carts will guarantee happy faces and stomachs for everyone.

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A turkey, brie, cranberry melt on a toasted baguette. It tastes like Thanksgiving.

|WHERE|

521 SW 10th Ave

Portland, OR 97205

|WHEN|

mon-sat until 3pm

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t, an urban teahouse // tea for normality

March 9, 2013 § Leave a comment

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Kaylan C. pours a fragrant strawberry white tea.

Hectic weeks, stacks of books, breakups and broken dishes – college turns difficult sometimes, but exploring always seems to put at least one out-of-place facet of life back where it belongs.

It was a dreadfully long day and I was prepared to curl up in bed with a Forster novel. I needed to soak up words because I used up all the ones I’d gathered the night before. But my roommate looked despondent and the apartment was too messy, so we climbed in the car and got lost in Nickel Hills. The important part is that we found t, an urban teahouse.

Soft lighting, bright silver tables, and the irresistible aroma of assorted teas greeted us more cheerily than we’d expected. A curly-headed brunette answered our barrage of questions with efficiency, offering us can after can of aromatic tea to help us make our decision. I settled on a lemon ginger oolong that smelled like sunshine. My roommate chose a dainty strawberry white tea highly reminiscent of childhood tea parties. 

Ten minutes later, we were pouring the fragrant liquid into small teacups and with the steady stream of tea flowed all the words we hadn’t used up yet.

The English have it figured out. There’s nothing quite like a cup of tea to get the world spinning right again.

So when you need a moment to gather your senses and retreat from the absurdity of everyday, duck into this small tea house and find peace in steeping tea leaves and a quiet buzz of conversation.

If you want a taste of tea culture in your home, their selection of loose-leaf tea is enormous and affordable. In addition to exceptional drinks, t also supports local artists and the majority of the art on the wall is temporary and available for sale. Bring your Keep It Local card, or buy one there and take advantage of the rewards you’ll get from supporting the local movement.

Oklahoma has never been revered for its appreciation of coffee and tea culture, but thanks to passionate entrepreneurs who open places like Cafe Evoke and t, an urban teahouse, the state’s coffee and tea community is beginning to make a mark on the up-and-coming city. Don’t just sit in your overstuffed chair and tell me that Lipton uses fresh tea leaves, go explore fresh(er) tea and community that you won’t find with a yellow box of teabags.

|WHERE|

7518 n. may suite d

okc, ok  73116

405.418.4333

|WHEN|

mon-fri  8-9

sat 10-9

sun 12-6

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